Giving Birth in Northwest Arkansas




Published November 2013
If you’re in Arkansas, you probably don't have access to hospital-level maternity care data.
Many states share hospital-level data because they believe patients deserve to have information to make informed choices about where to seek medical care, including where to give birth. Two states, New York and Massachusetts, have legislative mandates in place to provide maternity care patients with hospital rates of procedures.
In contrast, Arkansas Code §20-7-305 (the 1995 “State Health Data Clearing House Act”) was amended in 2005 and mandates that hospital-level data, including cesarean rates and other quality indicators, not be shared by the Arkansas Department of Health publicly. Read the law

Why should hospital-level cesarean rates be made publicly available to women, families and Arkansas taxpayers?
Cesarean rates are one of many indicators of hospital quality that a patient might consider when deciding where to give birth. A patient with a strong preference to deliver vaginally might select the local hospital with the lowest cesarean rate, then find a care provider with privileges at that hospital. As a health care consumer, information about hospital quality and pricing can serve as a starting point for more informed discussions among consumers, insurers and care providers.
In order to choose a hospital based in part on its cesarean rate, patients should be able to view total cesarean rates, cesarean rates of low risk, first time mothers and VBAC rates so women can make the best decision for them and their babies. Read more about cesarean rate reporting



Arkansas law currently limits hospital and doctor accountability to taxpayers. With all of the upcoming changes to the health insurance system as a result of the Affordable Care Act and with Arkansas Medicaid paying for 67.1% of pregnancies and births, you as a taxpayer have a right to insist that hospitals make their data transparent to the public.
Public reporting of maternity care quality indicators will cost the State of Arkansas nearly nothing, as the Arkansas Department of Health already invested in and uses the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality MONAHRQ software. Neighboring state Oklahoma uses the same software and provides information on hospital quality measures because they are not restricted by law from doing so. View Arkansas' MONAHRQ site (This site was password-protected by the department of health after this web page went live in Fall 2013)  |  View Oklahoma's MONAHRQ site







There are six facilities in Northwest Arkansas that handle planned deliveries. Four are located in Benton County and two are in Washington County.

Benton County


Mercy Hospital Northwest
2710 Rife Medical Lane
Rogers, AR 72758
(479) 338-8000

Northwest Medical Center - Bentonville
3000 Medical Center Parkway
Bentonville, AR 72712
(479) 553-1000

Siloam Springs Regional Hospital
603 North Progress Avenue
Siloam Springs, AR 72761
(479) 215-3000

Birth Center of Northwest Arkansas
5302 Village Parkway
Rogers, AR 72756
(479) 372-4560

Washington County


Washington Regional Medical Center
3215 North Hills Boulevard
Fayetteville, AR 72703
(479) 463-1000

Willow Creek Women's Hospital
4301 Greathouse Springs Road
Johnson, AR 72741
(479) 684-3000

This information was compiled in September 2013 from the Arkansas Hospital Association's Hospital Consumer Assist site.






Benton County


Birth Center of Northwest Arkansas

Has not yet been open for a full calendar year. Opened April 2013.


Mercy Hospital Northwest

Northwest Medical Center - Bentonville

Siloam Springs Regional Hospital


Washington County

Washington Regional Medical Center

Willow Creek Women's Hospital